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Election 2018: Midterms’ Effect on Employment Law Issues and Advocacy

    Voters will have the chance to determine the outcome of races for more than 6,000 legislative seats and 36 governorships, as well as weigh in on 160 or so statewide ballot measures, on Election Day, November 6, 2018. While the federal elections, including the battle for control of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, will affect employment law throughout the country, the impact of state elections may be even greater on the companies doing businesses in some states.

    Spotlight: New York State Senate

    The lower house of New York State’s Legislature, the Assembly, has a substantial Democratic Party majority that will not change in November. However, the current Republican control of the State Senate hangs by a slim one-vote margin. Although a majority of the current Senators are registered Democrats, one conservative Democrat caucuses with the Republicans, giving Republicans that thin margin of control. The party leading the Senate in 2019 will depend on the November elections.

    Should control of the New York Senate flip to the Democrats, many of the progressive, pro-employee measures that have consistently passed in the Assembly, but failed in the Senate, likely will be taken up and passed by a new, liberal Senate majority.

    To learn about possible bills that have not passed the New York State Senate, but could have good chances of becoming law under a Democratic Senate majority, please click here to read the post by Jackson Lewis attorney Jonathan Bing. 

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    © 2018 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

    The information appearing on this site is for general informational purposes only and is not intended to provide legal advice to any individual or entity. New York State Society for Human Resource Management, Inc. (NYS SHRM)  urges you to consult with your own legal advisor before taking any action based on information appearing on this site or any site to which it may be linked.